POLENTA

POLENTA

Ingredients

500 g of flour farina bramata della bergamasca or bramàda corn flour
1,8 litres of water
10 g of cooking salt

Description

A good polenta needs time, patient, high-quality flour and… a careful cook. After pouring the corn flour in salted boiling water you have to stir it, but it’s not that simple! “Menare” – stirring the polenta is not an easy task: the elbow must stay still and must remain a raised position…it’s the wrist that directs the movement. The trick consists of not stirring it continuously: at first, you can just do it every 5 minutes, and then you must increase break duration until you get to one quarter of an hour, keeping the polenta uncovered and on the right fire intensity, so that it does not splatter nor remain still. It must puff, just like a locomotive!  


Put a copper cauldron with the right quantity of water; when the water is boiling add the salt, lower the heat and pour the corn flour very slowly, stirring with a whisk.
Cover it and let it grow for 2 minutes. During this initial phase, keep stirring it to avoid clumps: there must be none of them!
Once the cooking is over, a crust will have appeared all around the cauldron and polenta will remain in the middle of it. Give it one last stirring and quickly overturn it on a wooden board.
If you do not have a copper cauldron, you can use a pot whose material is a good heat conductor, featuring a slightly rounded angle between the bottom and the walls. Moreover, there also several electric cauldrons are available.

Continue

A good polenta needs time, patient, high-quality flour and… a careful cook. After pouring the corn flour in salted boiling water you have to stir it, but it’s not that simple! “Menare” – stirring the polenta is not an easy task: the elbow must stay still and must remain a raised position…it’s the wrist that directs the movement. The trick consists of not stirring it continuously: at first, you can just do it every 5 minutes, and then you must increase break duration until you get to one quarter of an hour, keeping the polenta uncovered and on the right fire intensity, so that it does not splatter nor remain still. It must puff, just like a locomotive!  


Put a copper cauldron with the right quantity of water; when the water is boiling add the salt, lower the heat and pour the corn flour very slowly, stirring with a whisk.
Cover it and let it grow for 2 minutes. During this initial phase, keep stirring it to avoid clumps: there must be none of them!
Once the cooking is over, a crust will have appeared all around the cauldron and polenta will remain in the middle of it. Give it one last stirring and quickly overturn it on a wooden board.
If you do not have a copper cauldron, you can use a pot whose material is a good heat conductor, featuring a slightly rounded angle between the bottom and the walls. Moreover, there also several electric cauldrons are available.

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