Cornabusa Sanctuary

Description

The sanctuary is located in a very arduous area among trees, rocks and mountain peaks, in a beautiful landscape combining peace, meditation and emotion. This mystical place was born during the struggles between Guelph and Ghibellines, between 1350 and 1440.

Trying to escape the violence, some people sheltered inside a “corna busa”, meaning natural cave in Bergamo dialect. One of them brought a little wooden statue of the Madonna, but he forgot it in the cave after he went back to the village.

The worship of the “Madonna della Grotta” – the Cave Madonna – which later turned into the “Madonna della Cornabusa” dates back to a later period.

A deaf-mute girl happened to arrive to the cave as she was grazing her sheep: she found the wooden statue and miraculously got back both her voice and her hearing. The venerated statue is about 80 cm high and was sculpted in a XV Century wood. The mystical fascination of the sanctuary is enhanced by the candlelight reflecting on the cave’s walls as the water drips from the ceiling.

The surrounding landscape conveys a deep sense of meditation.

The refuge can also be reached by car. From the parking place, the trail ventures into the woods and follows the eight chapels dedicated to the Marian mysteries and history of the young girl. Once you have reached the cave, you can see a small temple closed by an iron grating, housing the statue. The actual shrine is open only from Easter Monday until the end of summer.


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The sanctuary is located in a very arduous area among trees, rocks and mountain peaks, in a beautiful landscape combining peace, meditation and emotion. This mystical place was born during the struggles between Guelph and Ghibellines, between 1350 and 1440.

Trying to escape the violence, some people sheltered inside a “corna busa”, meaning natural cave in Bergamo dialect. One of them brought a little wooden statue of the Madonna, but he forgot it in the cave after he went back to the village.

The worship of the “Madonna della Grotta” – the Cave Madonna – which later turned into the “Madonna della Cornabusa” dates back to a later period.

A deaf-mute girl happened to arrive to the cave as she was grazing her sheep: she found the wooden statue and miraculously got back both her voice and her hearing. The venerated statue is about 80 cm high and was sculpted in a XV Century wood. The mystical fascination of the sanctuary is enhanced by the candlelight reflecting on the cave’s walls as the water drips from the ceiling.

The surrounding landscape conveys a deep sense of meditation.

The refuge can also be reached by car. From the parking place, the trail ventures into the woods and follows the eight chapels dedicated to the Marian mysteries and history of the young girl. Once you have reached the cave, you can see a small temple closed by an iron grating, housing the statue. The actual shrine is open only from Easter Monday until the end of summer.