Museum of Sacred Art

Description

Even so-called sacred art finds its place as a tourist attraction. Therefore, the furnishings and documents kept in the parish church of Schilpario, dedicated to St. Anthony of Padua, have been put on display.

In July 2007, this exhibition space was inaugurated, housed in the little church of S. Rocco, right next to the main church. Here, objects and furnishings are now on display that have been preserved by the Schilpario community for over four centuries.

Books, chalices, cruets, vestments and liturgy furnishings are flanked by memories able to make evident how art, history, culture, tradition and faith intertwined even in the Scalve Valley.


Of great effect is the sight of the dark wood catafalque. Once commonly used, it was able to provide, according to the height at which the "casket" was placed, the celebration of first, second or third class funerals.

From a sentimental point of view, among the preserved pieces stand out those belonging to prelates of different eras but with the common characteristic of being all born in Schilpario.

It is unusual to find objects belonging to the Cardinal Angelo Maj, an outstanding palaeographer who discovered fragments of Cicerone's "de Republica", to which Giacomo Leopardi dedicated an ode called "the famous discoverer".

Angelo Maj, in addition to the homonymous Library in Piazza Vecchia (Bergamo-Upper Town), also has the main square in Schilpario named after him.

Inside the Museum of Sacred Art there are also objects belonging to Mons. Simon Pietro Grassi who, in the 1930s, became bishop of the Piedmontese town of Tortona and to Msgr. Andrea Spada, who for more than 50 years was the editor of the L'Eco di Bergamo newspaper.

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Even so-called sacred art finds its place as a tourist attraction. Therefore, the furnishings and documents kept in the parish church of Schilpario, dedicated to St. Anthony of Padua, have been put on display.

In July 2007, this exhibition space was inaugurated, housed in the little church of S. Rocco, right next to the main church. Here, objects and furnishings are now on display that have been preserved by the Schilpario community for over four centuries.

Books, chalices, cruets, vestments and liturgy furnishings are flanked by memories able to make evident how art, history, culture, tradition and faith intertwined even in the Scalve Valley.


Of great effect is the sight of the dark wood catafalque. Once commonly used, it was able to provide, according to the height at which the "casket" was placed, the celebration of first, second or third class funerals.

From a sentimental point of view, among the preserved pieces stand out those belonging to prelates of different eras but with the common characteristic of being all born in Schilpario.

It is unusual to find objects belonging to the Cardinal Angelo Maj, an outstanding palaeographer who discovered fragments of Cicerone's "de Republica", to which Giacomo Leopardi dedicated an ode called "the famous discoverer".

Angelo Maj, in addition to the homonymous Library in Piazza Vecchia (Bergamo-Upper Town), also has the main square in Schilpario named after him.

Inside the Museum of Sacred Art there are also objects belonging to Mons. Simon Pietro Grassi who, in the 1930s, became bishop of the Piedmontese town of Tortona and to Msgr. Andrea Spada, who for more than 50 years was the editor of the L'Eco di Bergamo newspaper.