Buca del Corno

Description

Described as early as 1875 by Abbot Stoppani, the Buca del Corno is a karstic cave dating back to prehistoric times. At 385 metres long, it includes the Waterfall Room, the Vortex Room, the Landslide room and the Altar Room.

This is an active cave, i.e. a cavity that water flows through, the course of which can reach considerable force in the event of abundant rainfall. The roar of the flowing water makes visiting the grotto fascinating.
If you’re passionate about noir, you know that most probably the Altar Room was a burial place: the artefacts found here are now exhibited at the Archaeological Museum of Bergamo.

In the cave you can encounter some unique wildlife. Allegrettia Pavani, a rare beetle, lives here; unfortunately it's a bit timid, so take a good look good around to find it.

La Buca del Corno can be visited internally only by reservation and with a guide. The park surrounding it is also equipped with barbecues and tables, the ideal place for a hiking in nature.


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Described as early as 1875 by Abbot Stoppani, the Buca del Corno is a karstic cave dating back to prehistoric times. At 385 metres long, it includes the Waterfall Room, the Vortex Room, the Landslide room and the Altar Room.

This is an active cave, i.e. a cavity that water flows through, the course of which can reach considerable force in the event of abundant rainfall. The roar of the flowing water makes visiting the grotto fascinating.
If you’re passionate about noir, you know that most probably the Altar Room was a burial place: the artefacts found here are now exhibited at the Archaeological Museum of Bergamo.

In the cave you can encounter some unique wildlife. Allegrettia Pavani, a rare beetle, lives here; unfortunately it's a bit timid, so take a good look good around to find it.

La Buca del Corno can be visited internally only by reservation and with a guide. The park surrounding it is also equipped with barbecues and tables, the ideal place for a hiking in nature.