Archaeological Museum

Archaeological Museum

Description

The first exhibition of the current Archaeology Museum was located in the Loggia under the Palazzo della Ragione, in Piazza Vecchia, where it was simply a “collection of old stuff” and included several epigraphs.

Since then, the collection moved several times: in fact, it required more and more space due to the conspicuous and constant donations over the centuries. Today the Museum is housed in the Cittadella Palace (XIV Century), built by the Visconti family, Milan’s ancient rulers.

Visitors can plunge into history just looking at the museum’s walls. Visiting the Archaeology Museum is like going on a journey across the history of Bergamo and its territory, from its prehistoric background to the Langobardic domination in the Middle Age.
It is very common do find groups of children and kids inside it. In fact, the “Centro Didattico-culturale”, the former “Gruppo Guide del Museo” established in 1981, contributes to give a strong educational spirit to the Museum, by carrying out many guided tours, workshops and activities for children and adults.


An itinerant museum: the other historical seats of the collection.
In 1770, the collection was transferred from the first seat to the palace above the Fontanone fountain, where it remained until 1818, the year it was dismantled and subdivided.

Meanwhile, other collections were created, such as the remarkable donation by the Count Paolo Vimercati Sozzi, consisting of artefacts coming from all over the province, along with many remains discovered by chance in several excavation sites, then registered in the specialized publication “Notizie Archeologiche Bergomensi” published in 1900 by Professor Gaetano Mantovani.

In the Rocca fortress, during the early ‘30s, all the collections were gathered for the first time: unfortunately, they had to be secured during the War. Only in 1960 the Museum finally found its permanent location.

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The first exhibition of the current Archaeology Museum was located in the Loggia under the Palazzo della Ragione, in Piazza Vecchia, where it was simply a “collection of old stuff” and included several epigraphs.

Since then, the collection moved several times: in fact, it required more and more space due to the conspicuous and constant donations over the centuries. Today the Museum is housed in the Cittadella Palace (XIV Century), built by the Visconti family, Milan’s ancient rulers.

Visitors can plunge into history just looking at the museum’s walls. Visiting the Archaeology Museum is like going on a journey across the history of Bergamo and its territory, from its prehistoric background to the Langobardic domination in the Middle Age.
It is very common do find groups of children and kids inside it. In fact, the “Centro Didattico-culturale”, the former “Gruppo Guide del Museo” established in 1981, contributes to give a strong educational spirit to the Museum, by carrying out many guided tours, workshops and activities for children and adults.


An itinerant museum: the other historical seats of the collection.
In 1770, the collection was transferred from the first seat to the palace above the Fontanone fountain, where it remained until 1818, the year it was dismantled and subdivided.

Meanwhile, other collections were created, such as the remarkable donation by the Count Paolo Vimercati Sozzi, consisting of artefacts coming from all over the province, along with many remains discovered by chance in several excavation sites, then registered in the specialized publication “Notizie Archeologiche Bergomensi” published in 1900 by Professor Gaetano Mantovani.

In the Rocca fortress, during the early ‘30s, all the collections were gathered for the first time: unfortunately, they had to be secured during the War. Only in 1960 the Museum finally found its permanent location.

Accessibility

Getting there

150 metres (Largo Colle Aperto): 3 reserved parking spaces according to law; possibility to request a parking permit in Piazza Cittadella.

150 metres (Largo Colle Aperto): bus terminus line 1; step height 15cm; bus equipped with manual platform. 

Pedestrian path from carparks and bus stop: flat and adequate in terms of width and type of paving; no tactile ground surface indicators.

Entering

Flat entrance on ground level preceded by paving in slightly uneven stone slabs; Ticket counter height = 100cm.

Access to exhibition rooms on flat ground level, directly from the ticket office.

Visiting

Almost all exhibition space on the ground floor + a mezzanine space accessible by stairs and a lifting platform (door width 80cm; cabin 80x120; load capacity 250kg).

Many objects are placed in displays at a height of 110cm and the labels, placed on the floor, are difficult to read.

There are no measures for the visually impaired.

Using the bathroom

Accessible bathroom on the ground floor next to the ticket office. Door 85cm with external opening; cubicle 190x200cm; WC height 52cm, frontal and lateral approach; presence of hand rails; hand shower for bidet; ergonomic washbasin 80cm high, with inclined mirror.

 

Synthetic evaluation

O = person with motor disability: accessible independently.

/ = person with visual impairment: not very usable.

Gallery

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