Valle del Brunone

Description

The valley is named after the creek crossing it, creating a perfect and lush natural landscape with woods, meadows and trails leading to isolated cottages.
This bucolic place is mostly renowned for the outcrops of black argillites discovered in 1973: these rocks hold a rich fossil fauna dating back to the Late Triassic, i.e. more than 200 million years ago!

Reptiles, fishes, crustaceous and insects have been discovered. The most spectacular one is a dragonfly named Italophlebia gervasuttii, in whose wings you can still see the veining network.


The Brunone Valley has been declared a Natural Monument in 2001, as Bergamo Science Museum wanted to protect its invaluable biological heritage. The protected area is located near Ponte Giurino and includes the middle and the lower flow of Brunone Creek, a tributary of the Imagna Creek, surrounded by mixed deciduous forests.
Another peculiar feature distinguish the valley: sulphurous water. The process leading to the formation of these waters is extremely complex and originates several kilometres away, from the waters pouring out of the argillite in Riva di Solto, near the lake. The scientist Antonio Stoppani, in his work “Il Bel Paese”, already mentioned their curative properties back in 1876.

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The valley is named after the creek crossing it, creating a perfect and lush natural landscape with woods, meadows and trails leading to isolated cottages.
This bucolic place is mostly renowned for the outcrops of black argillites discovered in 1973: these rocks hold a rich fossil fauna dating back to the Late Triassic, i.e. more than 200 million years ago!

Reptiles, fishes, crustaceous and insects have been discovered. The most spectacular one is a dragonfly named Italophlebia gervasuttii, in whose wings you can still see the veining network.


The Brunone Valley has been declared a Natural Monument in 2001, as Bergamo Science Museum wanted to protect its invaluable biological heritage. The protected area is located near Ponte Giurino and includes the middle and the lower flow of Brunone Creek, a tributary of the Imagna Creek, surrounded by mixed deciduous forests.
Another peculiar feature distinguish the valley: sulphurous water. The process leading to the formation of these waters is extremely complex and originates several kilometres away, from the waters pouring out of the argillite in Riva di Solto, near the lake. The scientist Antonio Stoppani, in his work “Il Bel Paese”, already mentioned their curative properties back in 1876.