Palazzo Moroni

Palazzo Moroni

Description

Palazzo Moroni is located in Via Porta Dipinta (Upper Town) and is characterised by exceptionally well-preserved interiors and furnishings, as well as a rich art collection and an Italian garden with a large vegetable garden. The magnificent building therefore offers visitors not only art and history, but also an enchanting historical park in the heart of Upper Bergamo.

 

The Moroni family has owned and lived in the building since 1636. The original layout has been carefully maintained and preserved; the monumental staircase leads from the entrance courtyard to the noble floor, behind whose doors are rooms and halls frescoed and furnished between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries.

 

In the main rooms the proofs of Barbelli's fresco mastery remain in all their beauty, and here is also preserved the large and varied Moroni Collection. Here, in addition to works by Bernardino Luini, Cesare Tallone, the famous portraits of Gian Gerolamo Grumelli (The Knight in Pink) and Isotta Brembati stand out, executed by the painter Giovanni Battista Moroni of Albino.

 

Since its construction, the building overlooks a complex of Italian gardens, divided into a balcony and three terraces that develop close to the Sant’Eufemia Hill. The third and highest terrace gives access to the Count's Thinking Room, a neo-medieval style tower built in the nineteenth century on the remains of an older structure, formerly belonging to the civic fortress, which surrounds the top of the hill.

 

Beyond the actual gardens there are about two hectares of vegetable garden, annexed to the property during the nineteenth century thanks to the brothers Pietro and Alessandro Moroni, the latter scholar of agronomy. In the area, there are still vines grown on pergola, fruit trees and a roccolo, that is a circle of hornbeam trees, whose intertwined branches acted as nets to hunt live birds for food and play. There are also mulberry trees, one of the symbols of the family, enriched with the breeding of the silkworm that feeds on the leaves of this tree.

 

Thanks to the agreement between the FAI - Italian Environment Fund and the Palazzo Moroni Museum Foundationin December 2019, aimed at the restoration, management and enhancement of the superb Bergamo property, Palazzo and Giardini Moroni are now regularly open to the public.


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Palazzo Moroni is located in Via Porta Dipinta (Upper Town) and is characterised by exceptionally well-preserved interiors and furnishings, as well as a rich art collection and an Italian garden with a large vegetable garden. The magnificent building therefore offers visitors not only art and history, but also an enchanting historical park in the heart of Upper Bergamo.

 

The Moroni family has owned and lived in the building since 1636. The original layout has been carefully maintained and preserved; the monumental staircase leads from the entrance courtyard to the noble floor, behind whose doors are rooms and halls frescoed and furnished between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries.

 

In the main rooms the proofs of Barbelli's fresco mastery remain in all their beauty, and here is also preserved the large and varied Moroni Collection. Here, in addition to works by Bernardino Luini, Cesare Tallone, the famous portraits of Gian Gerolamo Grumelli (The Knight in Pink) and Isotta Brembati stand out, executed by the painter Giovanni Battista Moroni of Albino.

 

Since its construction, the building overlooks a complex of Italian gardens, divided into a balcony and three terraces that develop close to the Sant’Eufemia Hill. The third and highest terrace gives access to the Count's Thinking Room, a neo-medieval style tower built in the nineteenth century on the remains of an older structure, formerly belonging to the civic fortress, which surrounds the top of the hill.

 

Beyond the actual gardens there are about two hectares of vegetable garden, annexed to the property during the nineteenth century thanks to the brothers Pietro and Alessandro Moroni, the latter scholar of agronomy. In the area, there are still vines grown on pergola, fruit trees and a roccolo, that is a circle of hornbeam trees, whose intertwined branches acted as nets to hunt live birds for food and play. There are also mulberry trees, one of the symbols of the family, enriched with the breeding of the silkworm that feeds on the leaves of this tree.

 

Thanks to the agreement between the FAI - Italian Environment Fund and the Palazzo Moroni Museum Foundationin December 2019, aimed at the restoration, management and enhancement of the superb Bergamo property, Palazzo and Giardini Moroni are now regularly open to the public.


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