S. Michele al Pozzo Bianco Church

Description

Did you know that the famous Renaissance artist Lorenzo Lotto lived in the House of the Vicar, next to this church? Today the house partially belongs to the Ursuline sisters pension; also due to this favourable position, the Venetian Master created some wonderful artworks in the San Michele al Pozzo bianco Church, including the cycle of frescoes depicting the Episodes of Mary’s Life, painted in 1525 in the left side chapel.

If you love art, this church is a real treasure chest: in fact, it hosts some of the most ancient frescoes in Bergamo’s territory and represents an outstanding “lesson” of the local painting history, ranging from the early XIII Century to the late XVI.

The round stone you can now see on the churchyard marks the place where the ancient white well used to be, giving the name to the church itself.


The church dates back to the Langobardic period, but it was renovated more than once over the following centuries, up to 1915, when the bare stone façade was made. Probably the only original structures are part of the crypt, the external wall and a few more things.

The rest was rebuilt in the XV Century.

The refurbishing works carried out in the 1940s revealed the presence of refined (although incomplete) artworks dating back to the Early Middle Age. Some byzantine 1200-year paintings (and also previous) reveal the presence of an older church underneath the XV Century structure.

The building features a rectangular plan with a very peculiar and slightly irregular perimeter.

There are three chapels inside: you can enter the middle one by walking three steps, while looking through two small side-windows you can see the crypt underneath, which can be reached by means of a staircase located in the second church span, on the left.

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Did you know that the famous Renaissance artist Lorenzo Lotto lived in the House of the Vicar, next to this church? Today the house partially belongs to the Ursuline sisters pension; also due to this favourable position, the Venetian Master created some wonderful artworks in the San Michele al Pozzo bianco Church, including the cycle of frescoes depicting the Episodes of Mary’s Life, painted in 1525 in the left side chapel.

If you love art, this church is a real treasure chest: in fact, it hosts some of the most ancient frescoes in Bergamo’s territory and represents an outstanding “lesson” of the local painting history, ranging from the early XIII Century to the late XVI.

The round stone you can now see on the churchyard marks the place where the ancient white well used to be, giving the name to the church itself.


The church dates back to the Langobardic period, but it was renovated more than once over the following centuries, up to 1915, when the bare stone façade was made. Probably the only original structures are part of the crypt, the external wall and a few more things.

The rest was rebuilt in the XV Century.

The refurbishing works carried out in the 1940s revealed the presence of refined (although incomplete) artworks dating back to the Early Middle Age. Some byzantine 1200-year paintings (and also previous) reveal the presence of an older church underneath the XV Century structure.

The building features a rectangular plan with a very peculiar and slightly irregular perimeter.

There are three chapels inside: you can enter the middle one by walking three steps, while looking through two small side-windows you can see the crypt underneath, which can be reached by means of a staircase located in the second church span, on the left.