Borgo Pignolo • • Visit Bergamo

Borgo Pignolo

Description

“Borgo Pignolo” is located between the Upper and the Lower Bergamo. Going up the old district from below, you will get to Sant’Agostino Gate, walking along an incredibly charming route: wonderful Renaissance and Neoclassical palaces, artisan workshops, including a worldwide-renowned lute maker, and numerous fine restaurants.

Among the historical mansions there is also one of the city’s most prestigious places, the amazing Palazzo Agliardi. The most peculiar feature of Borgo Pignolo is the meeting between contemporary and ancient art: the numerous art galleries and antiquarian shops manage to carry out this “magic”.

Finally, the numerous lovely restaurants and cafes all along the main road, via Pignolo, contribute to add charm to the itinerary. Suddenly, the beautiful series of elegant palaces makes way to a spectacular view: the Sant’Agostino Gate, opening a breach in the Venetian Walls, along with the Fara Park and the amazing surrounding landscape.


While visiting this ancient district, you will surely notice the series of amazing aristocratic palaces and their lovely courtyards, along with the majestic Venetian Walls marking its border. Borgo Pignolo is commonly called “Borgo del Sapere – Knowledge Borough”.

In fact, the University of Bergamo Department of Humanities is located in its upper part, along the road walked by renowned Venetian figures in ancient times, such as distinguished deans or local authorities passing by the district heading to Città Alta.

Even the Tasso family once owned one of the beautiful Renaissance palaces of this borough, welcoming the famous poet Torquato Tasso in person! Other palaces host many incredible frescos.

Strolling down the cobblestones streets of the Borgo, don’t forget to enter the Church of San Bernardino, where an outstanding altarpiece by Lorenzo Lotto, dating back to 1521, is located. Finally, Borgo Pignolo also hosts the very interesting Museo Bernareggi, dedicated to religious art, whose 20 rooms also display some artworks by Lorenzo Lotto, Gian Battista Moroni and Carlo Ceresa. 

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“Borgo Pignolo” is located between the Upper and the Lower Bergamo. Going up the old district from below, you will get to Sant’Agostino Gate, walking along an incredibly charming route: wonderful Renaissance and Neoclassical palaces, artisan workshops, including a worldwide-renowned lute maker, and numerous fine restaurants.

Among the historical mansions there is also one of the city’s most prestigious places, the amazing Palazzo Agliardi. The most peculiar feature of Borgo Pignolo is the meeting between contemporary and ancient art: the numerous art galleries and antiquarian shops manage to carry out this “magic”.

Finally, the numerous lovely restaurants and cafes all along the main road, via Pignolo, contribute to add charm to the itinerary. Suddenly, the beautiful series of elegant palaces makes way to a spectacular view: the Sant’Agostino Gate, opening a breach in the Venetian Walls, along with the Fara Park and the amazing surrounding landscape.


While visiting this ancient district, you will surely notice the series of amazing aristocratic palaces and their lovely courtyards, along with the majestic Venetian Walls marking its border. Borgo Pignolo is commonly called “Borgo del Sapere – Knowledge Borough”.

In fact, the University of Bergamo Department of Humanities is located in its upper part, along the road walked by renowned Venetian figures in ancient times, such as distinguished deans or local authorities passing by the district heading to Città Alta.

Even the Tasso family once owned one of the beautiful Renaissance palaces of this borough, welcoming the famous poet Torquato Tasso in person! Other palaces host many incredible frescos.

Strolling down the cobblestones streets of the Borgo, don’t forget to enter the Church of San Bernardino, where an outstanding altarpiece by Lorenzo Lotto, dating back to 1521, is located. Finally, Borgo Pignolo also hosts the very interesting Museo Bernareggi, dedicated to religious art, whose 20 rooms also display some artworks by Lorenzo Lotto, Gian Battista Moroni and Carlo Ceresa.