Church of San Grata Inter Vites • • Visit Bergamo

Church of San Grata Inter Vites

Description

The Church is dedicated to Saint Grata, Bergamo’s co-patron, and it’s the first place where the Saint was buried, till the year One Thousand: later it was moved to the other church with the same name, in via Arena, inside the Walls perimeter.

Dating back to the XIV Century, this building was destroyed two hundred years later to make room to the Walls. Afterwards, it was erected back in the XVIII Century.

If you’re wondering what does “inter vites” mean, you should know that the church used to be surrounded by vineyards, which disappeared in the XVIII Century.

In front of the church you can admire the majestic St Gottardo Stairway, named after the ancient monastery demolished in 1798.

Inside the building you will find a frescos cycle called “Living skeletons scenes” (“Scene di scheletri viventi”), painted by the artist Paolo Bonomini in the XIX Century. During that time, it was considered as an extremely edgy artwork, as the skeletons resembled some actual people living in the borough: a carpenter, two praying friars, a couple of newlyweds, a Cisalpine Republic tambourine and even the artist himself, next to his wife.


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The Church is dedicated to Saint Grata, Bergamo’s co-patron, and it’s the first place where the Saint was buried, till the year One Thousand: later it was moved to the other church with the same name, in via Arena, inside the Walls perimeter.

Dating back to the XIV Century, this building was destroyed two hundred years later to make room to the Walls. Afterwards, it was erected back in the XVIII Century.

If you’re wondering what does “inter vites” mean, you should know that the church used to be surrounded by vineyards, which disappeared in the XVIII Century.

In front of the church you can admire the majestic St Gottardo Stairway, named after the ancient monastery demolished in 1798.

Inside the building you will find a frescos cycle called “Living skeletons scenes” (“Scene di scheletri viventi”), painted by the artist Paolo Bonomini in the XIX Century. During that time, it was considered as an extremely edgy artwork, as the skeletons resembled some actual people living in the borough: a carpenter, two praying friars, a couple of newlyweds, a Cisalpine Republic tambourine and even the artist himself, next to his wife.